(Bryna Hallam/YouTube)

In a court order on Tuesday, Judge Lisa Mrozinski ordered that the pitbull that attacked and fatally injured a Maltese poodle back in April be put down.

According to Times Colonist, the trial included a video of Bentley – the liver-colored pitbull in question – attacking a decoy Jack Russell terrier who has the scent of a dog.

During the trial, the owner of the now-deceased Maltese-poodle, Peter McPherson, testified that during the attack, there was nothing anyone could do to stop Bentley from attacking Cassie – the nine-pound pet Maltese-poodle.

Upon taking her to the Central Victoria Veterinary Hospital, it was clear that Cassie’s spine was stretched out, and trying to save her would have been tantamount to cruelty – she had to be put down.

One of Bentley’s two owners, Ryan Mulligan, stated that the pitbull got away from him and attacked Cassie while he was changing his collars.

Judge Mrozinski concluded that the prognosis for Bentley’s rehabilitation was poor, and ordered him to be put down within two weeks.

His owner, Mulligan, plans to appeal the order.

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  • Travelmate

    It is ridiculous to allow dogs like that as pets. There is no place for that kind of thing in a decent neighborhood with normal pets. Normal dogs will approach fighting dogs as if they’re normal because dogs are one of the most social animals on the planet. And then these perversions of dogs will kill them. Or, the more typical scenario is that the poor normal dog doesn’t even know the pit bull exists until the pit bull is killing it gruesomely and horrifically. Only the terminally ignorant think a pit like this could be rehabilitated. And the fact that it got three attacks off before managing to kill is unconscionable. CHANGE THE LAWS.

  • Denise Duirway

    This was the pitidiot owner’s pit bull’s 3rd mauling! They never learn their lesson not even the first time. The whole BC Dangerous Dog Law needs rehabilitation that these Jekyll x Hyde monsters are allowed to be pets in family neighborhoods! They will always be threats and need at the very least mandatory muzzling, microchipping, and sterilization incentives through reduced licensing fees of all smooth-haired power bred dogs over 35 pounds / 16 kg. Plus $500 fine for incorrect breed, sterilization status on the license form. All dogs not licensed should be fined $500 too.

    http://victoriabuzz.com/2017/10/provincial-court-rules-pitbull-be-put-down-after-it-fatally-attacked-a-pet-earlier-this-year/

    The last Pit bull’s euthanasia order that was appealed cost BC taxpayers $95,000 in Court costs and the owner won the appeal for his Pit bull to maul again. This travesty of justice is being allowed because BC does not have BSL safety laws!

    • Helena Morris

      Denise and Travelmate are total trolls wow. It’s the owners fault, not the dogs. Lay off the Koolaid.
      As an aside, if you post the same thing several times in one thread DENISE you are a full blown troll.

      Wish there was a trolling law.

      • Denise Duirway

        Are you the Pitnitwit breeding the lion killing Boerboels in BC? They are basically large Pit bulls with a turbo boost of power and are exactly the reason of why we need Provincial BSL safety muzzling and breeding laws. Yikes!

        • e small

          There was a fatality just a few months ago from a Boerboel:

          South African Boerboel Suspected in Breeder’s Death in Asheville, North Carolina
          A Brief History of the South African Mastiff – The ‘Farmer’s Bulldog’

          “Asheville, NC – On May 5, it was a reported that a 59-year old woman was found dead in her home with an aggressive South African boerboel. Deputies had discovered her body four days earlier — red flag. We looked into the case and quickly learned that Jane Egle was a breeder and seller of South African mastiffs. She had a dedicated website, “Beloved Boerboels,” that notes she previously worked with rottweilers and bullmastiffs, along with Facebook and Instagram pages.”

          (From Dogs bite dot org).

      • e small

        The Myth:
        When a fighting breed injures or kills a human or pet, advocates say “it’s not the breed, it’s the owner.” They claim that dogs only act aggressively if abused or mistreated.

        The Reality:

        Many breeds of dogs suffer a lifetime of pain and mistreatment without behaving aggressively. Examples include laboratory Beagles, cart-pulling dogs (pre-20th century), and the millions of street dogs living today all over the third world.

        About half of dogs that kill humans are indoor, middle-class family pets with no history of being abused or neglected. Most police investigations conclude that the owner did not contribute to the dog’s aggression through mistreatment of any sort.

        As a rule, dogs involved in violent incidents act very differently from abused dogs. Abused animals have a tendency to avoid conflict. They usually only bite when they are cornered and perceive that they have to defend themselves. This is called “fear biting”. They rarely inflict damage worse than a puncture wound. They do not escape from leashes, scale fences, or jump off of second floor balconies to launch an attack. They do not chase people or animals down to bite or maul them. Behaviors associated with abuse are actually considered “bold” behaviors that are rooted not in abuse, but in the dog’s own genetics.
        (From Daxton’s Friends-Pit Bull Myths).

  • e small

    Pit bulls are dangerous dogs:

    There are more than 25 media reports of pit bull attacks on people per week, and one death every 17 days.

    Pit bull attacks have increased 830% in seven years in the US and Canada.

    More than 1 in 40 pit bulls killed or seriously injured another animal in 2013-2014. By comparison, only 1 dog in 50,000 of all other breed types combined killed or seriously injured another animal.

    Pit bulls are zero-error dogs. There is zero room for mistakes like gates, doors or windows left open or unlocked; for leashes, chains and muzzles breaking or coming loose; or for people not strong enough or experienced enough to prevent attacks. (From National Pit Bull Victim Awareness dot org).